Ich habe in meinem Archiv noch alte Musikkassetten mit Aufnahmen von inzwischen historischem Wert gefunden.
 Hier könnt ihr sie euch anhören:

* DEMO-TAPE - CMI FAIRLIGHT [1981]

* DEMO-TAPE - ELEKTOR FORMANT SYSTEM

* RADIO-Mitschnitte der SFB-Sendung "Steckdose"

 

FAIRLIGHT C.M.I. DEMONSTRATION TAPE #2 NOTES JANUARY, 1981

This tape contains selections from many sources. Some tracks have been recorded purely for the purpose of this demonstration, and others are extracts from commissioned works that have been realized on the FAIRLIGHT over the past year. Examples from the latter category were not composed to "show off" the instrument, but rather to make use of it. In recording these works, free use was made of conventional peripheral devices (compression, tape delay, phasing). The selections recorded for the purpose of this tape do NOT contain any external modification other than reverberation. All the sounds on this tape were played on the C.M.I.
Each track is accompanied by the composer's name, its starting time and a code to its source and mode of recording.

  C = commissioned work
  M = multi-tracked (8 tks max)
  D = direct irom C.M.I. to % (with reverb only)
  S = includes use of PAGE 9 SEQUENCER (keyboard input)
  L = includes use of PAGE C (M.C.L.-typed input sequencer)
  K = includes conventional keyboard playing

The PAGE references refer to the DISPLAY PAGES of the FAIRLIGHT. The chapter references in parentheses refer to the USER'S MANUAL.

Side A
(1) PIFCO (David Vorhaus)................................... 00:00 (C,M,L)
  This is a sound-track of a television commercial for domestic appliances. The sounds were sampled from the products advertised, and used as to play a Christmas carol. M.C.L. was used to achieve perfect synchronisation with the visuals.
(2) EXAMPLES OF C.M.I. SOUNDS ............................ 00:48
  The Fairlight C.M.I. is supplied with a comprehensive library of over 200 sounds. These sounds were selected from this library and are presented to illustrate the wide range of sounds achievable with the Fairlight. They are all recorded direct to 1/4" tape with reverb only.
(3) FANFARE (Brian Gascoigne)............................... 12:33 (D,L)
  This fanfare is a conventional "opener". Performed by the M.C.L, the piece features a tightness and vitality that could not be achieved by conventional means.
(4) OILWELL (David Vorhaus)................................. 12:58 (C,M,L)
  This is part of a soundtrack written for a film about oil exploration. Powerful dynamics and use of both synthetic and natural sounds create images of heavy machinery. External sync was used to "conduct" the performance.
(5) VOGDANCE (Brian Gascoigne)............................. 14:33 (D,L)
  Extensive use was made of special M.C.L. features, such as automatic transposition, to realise this eight-part piece with very little typing effort. The ability to share one sequence among several parts simultaneously was especially useful.
(6) BUMBLE(Brian Gascoigne)................................15:43 (D,S)
  Played with the sound of a real bumble-bee, this performance was realised using the Sequencer (Page 9) MERGE facility. it was played at half speed on the music keyboard, then replayed at full speed. The Key Velocity was used to control the dynamics of the Viola voice.
(7) WAVE(Brian Gascoigne) .................................16:30
  Bubbly sounds created when experimenting with Page 4 Harmonic Synthesis inspired this piece. The "running down" effect was achieved by "conducting" the replay using external sync.
(8) BLOW 7 (Klaus Netzle)................................... 16:58 (C,M,L)
  The saxophone-like sound used on this piece was achieved by modifying a sample taken from the real instrument using Page 5 (Harmonics Synthesis) and Page 6 (Merge) modes.
(9) PHASEPAT(Klaus Netzle).................................18:45 (C,M,L)
  This piece relies on fast accurate playing for its effect. Using M.C.L. in conjunction with external sync made this an easy task.
(10) BATHSYMPHONY(Stephen Paine).........................19:25 (D,S)
  This piece demonstrates the wide dynamic control possible using key velocity to control attack speed and volume. The dra~atic bass chord was created by multi-tracking five orchestral instruments on tape and sampling the composite sound to create a single voice.
SIDE B   all tracks by Michael Carlos
(1) JUNGLE............................................... 00:00 (D,S)
  The instrument was configured to provide a keyboard full of 'animals', from lions in the lowest octave, to twittering birds in the highest. Of these sounds, only the KOOKABURRA was obtained by 'sampling' a recording of a real bird (actually it was a Lyre Bird imitating a Kookaburra!) (PAGE 8); the LION, SQUAWKING BIRD and TWITTERING BIRDS are all modulations of a human voice.
(2) CHIMES_DOG ........................................... 0:21 (M,K)
  Obtained by sampling a small hand-held bell, the CHIMES were played by simply holding down a cluster of keys. By causing each event to repeat at a rate proportional to its pitch with the LOOP function (PAGE 4), a seemingly random pattern of cross rhythms was generated. The DOG was obtained by sampling a real dog.
(3) STRINGS.............................................. 0:49 (M,K)
  PAGE 8 was used to make two samples of a violin (middle C and two octaves higher). The resulting voices were then loaded along with COPIES of themselves to create a duophonic (two- note) register for the right hand in which a single key activated three separate voices. A monophonic register activating two voices was created for the left hand. This use of MULTI-VQICE registerS (PAGE 3 C3.31.02) allows the CONTROL PARAMETERS (PAGE 7) for each voice to be independently specified. In this case, the three keyboard faders were assigned to the VIBRATO SPEEDS of the three voices activated by any key in the right hand register. The described instrument was then conventionally multi-tracked (4 tks) to create the example heard.
(4) TIMELAPSE............................................. 1:21 (C,M,L,K)
  The very first practical use of the FAIRLIGHT, this theme for a TV series was recorded with the prototype of the instrument. A Japanese KOTO and a harmonically generated (PAGE 4) voice double on sequencer bass while a TROMBONE sample plays the melody. The piano-ish sound is known as PIANOLIN, and consists of a piano sample which dynamically merges with a simple sine wave and then sustains for the duration of the key depression.
(5) BAR BACH.............................................. 2:21 (D,L)
  Obtained by sampling a tuning bar being struck, the voice called BAR and a harmonically generated (PAGE 4) voice play this short extract from an as yet uncompleted transcription of the entire piece into FAIRLIGHT M.C.L. (Music Composition Language). If the latter half of the example is played whiie monitoring only one side of the stereo and then comparing it with the opposite side, the useful separation of parts possible with this language is revealed.
(6) DEATH OF ANZAC ....................................... 2:46 (C,M,K)
  This is part of the background score for a live theatre work. Most of the sounds were generated with a combination of PAGES 4, 5 and 6. The 'harmonica' was constructed by creating a MULTI- VOICE register (C.31.02) coritaining two slightly de-tuned samples of a MELODICA to simulate the double reed.
(7) GUITAR................................................ 4:06 (M,K)
  An excellent example of FAIRLIGHT keyboard technique, this little 'guitar' piece came to us on cassette from a musician in the U.S.A. We added some 'strings' (same configuration as track 3) and include it with thanks
(8) LURCH.....,........................................... 4:34 (M,S,K)
  The percussive sounds in this piece come from a smashing bottle. When joined in a MULTI-VOICE register with a human groan, we were prompted to name the combination LURCH. Also included are some TYMPANI and a BALINESE GONG linked with a TOM TOM.
(9) SONG ................................................. 5:06 (O,S)
  A PAGE 9 SEQUENCE plays an instrument comprised of seven voices: a sample for each syllable. The keyboards were then configured with a syllable per octave.
(10) WHITE CROW........................................... 5:14 (C,M,S,K)
  Also from the score to a live theatre work, this features the same PIANOLIN sound heard in track 4. The background wash was made by multi-tracking the same sequence with various tuning offsets.
(11) ARCO ................................................. 6:22 (M,S,K)
  Derived entirely from a VIOLA (one arco sample, one pizz sampie), the only multi-tracking invo1ved was to add the pizz 'basses'. The rest of the track was played on the keyboard and stored with the PAGE 9 SEOUENCER. When transferred to tape, the sequencer speed was increased about 30 per cent overall, and 'conducted' by use of the EXTERNAL SYNC function (C.92.04).
(12) TESTING............................................... 7:1S (D,L)
  This was an early experiment with the capabilities of M.C.L. Four melodic fragments are being repeated, transposed, and superimposed in a pseudo-random way. From idea to performance, the sequencer programming took about five minutes. This is only a fraction of the whole sequence which can be made to run for hours, constantly changing its immediate structure and density.
(13) BLUES PIANO........................................... 8:08 (D,S)
  Certainly one of ttie most difficult instruments to recreate electronically, this example contains two samples of different registers of the piano.
(14) KEYTAR................................................ 8:53 (C,D,K)
  Obtained by sampling a SITAR. Surprisingly, this was not a difficult instrument to sample. Note the presence of the actuai sound of the strings being released by the plectra, particularly in the bass.
(15) EXPLORER ............................................. 9:16 (C,M,S,L)
  This is a TV jingle, minus vocals. The slap echo on the 'guitar' is being done in realtime by M.C.L., it was sirnply written in, The bass is electronic (harmonically synthesized on PAGE 4) and the opening cascade is the sampled TUNING FORK again.
(16) THE EDGE.............................................. 9:41 (C,M,S,K)
  The highlight of this excerpt from a modern dance piece is the sequence of drum fills. The stereo was generated in these fills by double tracking the same sequence but with a slightly later starting point. Near the end you can hear the CYMBAL which is used in track 17. The 'wind' was obtained by sampling my breath, and multi-tracking the same sequence with tiny delays as described. In track 17, you can hear the non-sustaining version of the sampled breath as separate inhalations.
(17) GORGON.............................................. 12:30 (C,M,S,K)
  From the same work as above, the growling drone in this track is a modified sample of an ordinary cymbal crash. It is included here as an example of how far one can go in modifying an externally derived sound.
(18) VIONET FANTASY.......................................13:12 (D,S)
  The combination of clarinet and violin samples in a MULTI-VOICE Register gave a good 'spitty' attack to this sound. As with the other examples which have been recorded directly to 1/4", the stereo image is determined by mixing and panning the eight individual channel outputs with a conventio~al audio mixer.
(19) NEVER GOING DROVIN'..................................15:01
  The 1/8-note arpeggio is played with a sample of an oscillating WINE GLASS.
  (C,M,K)
(20) YOUR MOTHER SHOULD KNOW ...........................18:15 (D,L.)
  With the exception of the BASS, which is a harmonically synthesized sound, this is played by an ensemble of clarinet and trombone samples. Written entirely in M.C.L. and not multi-tracked, the piece was 'conducted' by use of the EXTERNAL SYNC function when transferred to tape.
(21) WAR GAMES................................,.......... 19:34 (C,M,S)
  As in track 2, the LOOP FUNCTION (C.41.11) has been used to create pitch-dependent repeating of individual events. The sound is the pizz VIOLA of track 11. The same sequence was multi-tracked with tape speed variation to generate the slight phasing.
(22) TEA.........................,........................ 20:19 (C,D,S)
  Three samples were taken: pouring water, stirring spoon and dropped spoon. Used humorously within the context of a live theatre piece, this example! Ilustrates the power of the FAIRLIGHT in generating natural sound effects in addition to instrumental sounds.

ELEKTOR - FORMANT  Modularsystem

Wer es nicht kennt: Ein System zu dem die Elektronik-Bastler-Zeitschrift Elektor die Pläne und auf Wunsch auch Platinen usw. lieferte. Die Schaltungen sind recht einfach und so sind auch die Ergebnisse eher bescheiden. Wer solches System angeboten bekommt muß wissen, daß die Qualität der Baugruppenn sehr (!!) unterschiedlich ausfallen kann, es ist eben ein Selbstbau-System.. Hier im Anschluß die Demo-Cassette

RADIO-Mitschnitte
Auszüge von Mitschnitten aus einigen SFB-Sendungen "Steckkdose" und einem Interview mit Norbert beim RIAS (Treffpunkt)  Bei den Superlativen und Aussagen wie "eine Kirchenorgel zum verlieben" übrigens bitte daran denken, daß diese Sendungen im letzten Jahrtausend liefen :-) Wer noch Mitschnitte von der STECKDOSE hat, bitte melden
**  Steckdose-Trailer "Steckdose" Sender Freies Berlin, SFB, Redakteur Wolfgang Layer
**  unsere Serie Modulare Systeme Teil 1 - Marktübersicht
**  unsere Serie Modulare Systeme Teil 2 - Fertigsysteme
**  unsere Serie Modulare Systeme Teil 3 -Bausatzsysteme
**  Testbericht Roland Jupiter 6 -der kleine Bruder des Jupi8 und doch besser!?
**  Testbericht BME Rattlesnake - Percussion Synthesis
**  Testbericht ELKA Synthex ..wurde von Elka als Demo-Cassette übernommen.
**  Werbung über uns beim SFB und im RIAS-Treffpunkt
(die genannten Telefon-Nummern sind NICHT mehr richtig, also nicht anrufen)
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